iRise Executive Coaching

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Latest from iRise Executive Coaching

Clear the clutter – physical, mental, and emotional. Let’s first explore productivity. Productivity, simply put, is the ratio of output to input.  The higher the output compared to input, the higher that productivity is measured; however increasing productivity is more easily said than actually done. Not all output and input is easily quantifiable, especially personal effort, energy, and opportunity costs.  I often see and hear leaders use time as a measurement of input in the productivity equation. The hope is that, as more time is devoted to a project, the output will increase and therefore so will the productivity…
Is Burnout leading to Imposter Syndrome or is Imposter Syndrome leading to Burnout? Let’s explore this question further. I was listening to a Peloton meditation guided by trainer Anna Greenberg and heard her say “Aim for progress, not perfection.” It is the same line I have used multiple times with my coaching clients who–like many high achieving individuals–measure progress through the lens of perfectionism. If it isn’t perfect, it’s not good enough. Striving for perfection, especially for an individual that is constantly multi-tasking and juggling multiple priorities, adds more to an already full plate. This can increase burnout. Aiming for…
I recently coached a team of physicians and nurses in conflict. Individual members of the team had been recognized for their great service to patients, had great recommendations from peers, and colleagues outside their service, but their clinical service team together had been evaluated as “dysfunctional” and “uncoordinated.” The unit had a culture of gossip, with certain members frustrated by a perceived lack of collegiality. The nursing and physician leaders also struggled with getting along. I was commissioned by the executive leadership team to identify, strategize, and help facilitate workshops that would create better working relationships with the team members.…
Damian, a client of mine, started coaching with me when he was “stuck” in his career and struggling to get promotional opportunities. In order for him to take a more positive approach to his vision and goal setting, I had him take the CliftonStrengths Assessment. Through this tool, he understood that his natural leadership style is in the strategic thinking domain. He can brainstorm many ideas to a problem, analyze enormous amounts of data, and is able to conceptualize objective solutions. Instead of trying to “fix” what he perceived were weaknesses, he leveraged his strengths to set clear goals…
Meet Damian (name altered for anonymity). Age 45 and Director in a clinical research team with a major pharmaceutical firm. Damian had worked in various roles in the pharmaceutical industry for over 20 years as a scientist and administrative leader. I first met him when he felt “stuck” in his current role. He had been in the same position for 5 years and while he had received pay raises, he had not been given any opportunity for promotion or significant professional growth. During our initial sessions, he explained to me all the constructive feedback he had received in recent years.…
Over the course of my career I have been fortunate to have the greatest mentors. As I reflect on how those relationships were created, I realize that I found mentors in various ways. Some were automatic like with my boss. Some I sought out through meetings at work or social gatherings, and some were created coincidentally where a partnership was formed without me even realizing it. The common thread amongst how all my mentorship relationships began is that I engaged with my mentor in person. I sat with them in meetings. I had a drink with them at a party.…
I recently met a human resources professional, specifically a recruiter, who specializes in placing physicians with medical groups and practices across the country. He had read my blog regarding bias in the workplace and we had a lively discussion about how organizations are not doing enough to recognize unconscious bias amongst their employees. While he’s been fortunate to work with some healthcare organizations that have requested he recruit diverse candidates, he relayed some of his frustration. He continues to see a cycle emerge with certain groups – he helps attract diverse candidates only to see them leave those organizations within…
The culture of the workplace has been created and maintained by male leaders, and nearly all major operational decisions are still made by men. As I reflect over my 20+ career, numerous moments in conference rooms, offices, or one of thousands of emails flash before my eyes. I didn’t realize the impact I could have made to change the structures and culture of the department. I think back to when critical decisions were being made related to female employees, and my role in them. I had some decision-making authority and a lot of influence to say more and do more.…
There once was a female, woman of color, who became a manager in a large department. A few hours into her first day on the job, a male colleague she met made a joke about “hot women” in the department. A few days later, she was finishing up a lunch meeting with five white male colleagues when her boss turned to her and said, “the trash on the table needs to be cleared.” A few weeks later, she sat quietly listening to a group of executives complaining about “transgender people and special bathrooms.” And even a few months later, when…
How often have you heard someone say “I am not biased?” I have heard it many more times than I can count. I hear people say they are not racist and are not prejudiced against any groups. But research says differently. Numerous organizations have repeatedly studied or reported on the presence of bias in the workplace. Everyone has some degree of bias – whether explicit or more commonly, implicit bias.  Implicit bias is often bred out of stereotypes, and occurs when individuals have unconscious, negative attitudes towards others. We then take these unconscious biases into the workplace and react…