Jackson Lewis

Employers in California are faced with a myriad of complex federal and state laws.  It does not stop there.  An employer with employees working in the City of Oakland may also need to comply with local ordinances.

The following is an overview of employment regulations in Oakland.

Minimum Wage

Like several other cities in California, Oakland has its own citywide

In Grande v. Eisenhower Medical Center, FlexCare, LLC (“FlexCare”), a temporary staffing agency, assigned Plaintiff to work as a nurse at Eisenhower Medical Center (“Eisenhower”). The plaintiff alleged that during her employment at Eisenhower, FlexCare and Eisenhower failed to ensure she received the required meal and rest periods, wages for certain periods she worked, and overtime wages. She then filed

The underlying action, Naranjo v. Spectrum Security Services, was a class action brought by former and current employees, alleging violations of meal period violations. The plaintiffs sought not only premium wages for the violations but also waiting time penalties and penalties for failure to provide accurate wage statements. The results of the trial court decision were mixed and appealed.

The

The Washington State Legislature has again amended the state’s Paid Family and Medical Leave (PFML) Act.  This amendment is effective June 9, 2022.  Here is a list of the most significant changes to the law:

  • First six weeks of postnatal leave for incapacitated employee is presumptively medical leave. During the six-week postnatal period, any PFML used by an employee who

Generally, the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) requires employers to pay at least minimum wage (currently $7.25) for all non-overtime hours in a workweek. However, subject to any contradictory state laws, an employer may pay a “tipped employee” – one who customarily and regularly receives at least $30 per month in tips – a reduced minimum wage of $2.13 per

In this issue of the Class Action Trends Report, Jackson Lewis attorneys look back at class action developments in 2021, including COVID-19 vaccine mandate litigation, significant procedural decisions, wage and hour suits, and the continuing rise of cases brought under the California Private Attorneys General Act and Illinois Biometric Information Privacy Act, among other litigation trends.

The California Court of Appeal, in Cirrincione v. American Scissor Lift, Inc. recently upheld a trial court order denying class certification in a wage and hour class action. Since class certification is so often granted, this decision warrants further attention.

The underlying case involved an employee bringing multiple wage and hour claims, including allegations that the employer engaged in unlawful